Bentley College Marketing- Honors

This blog is for MK 402-H01 and the greater Bentley College population.

Monday, March 20, 2006

Interesting vs. Interested

In honor of my first blog comment (as those of you in class know, I’ve been quite frustrated that I have received no blog comments… until now!), I’ve decided to dedicate this week’s blog to my commenter, Mike Wagner, and write about a posting on his blog site, “Own Your Brand.” Mike is involved with a company (by involved it appears that he IS the company… telling from the website) called the White Rabbit Group that helps companies become “unstuck” in the key areas of sales, internet, branding and innovation.

Mike’s March 16th posting is titled “Want to be interesting? Start by being interested!” and he comments on his experience with brand building and his frustration with companies who perceive brand building as a simple advertising campaign. Mike describes the fact that this usually is a request to make the company appear interesting to its consumers, rather than focus on the true meaning of brand building and ownership, which Mike states is actually “about your interest in the product, the service and ultimately the human beings that become your customers. Brand owners study their customers, reflect on their business and always want to learn more.”

This blog is marketing related as it discusses brand image as well as advertising and the difference between the nature of the two and their relation to the company and the customer. Mike brought up points regarding the level of interest the customer feels a company has for the customer and its correlation to the success of a brand. Overall, Mikes discussion of brand ownership and keys to accomplishing this difficult task relate this blog entry to marketing.

In terms of informing marketing, I believe Mike packs a lot of insight into this blog entry that many marketers may find useful when attempting to build a brand themselves. Often times, as has been demonstrated by past readings (think the railway example), marketers find themselves wrapped up in trying to sell a product and a product alone and making themselves appear interesting to the consumer rather than focusing on the wants and needs of the consumer and actually being interested in understanding the dynamic of the customer. I believe this is a dynamic that is often overlooked and has most likely resulted in the demise of many brands. Mike’s also makes a point regarding the desire to always learn more about consumers and its positive relation to brand ownership. Again, I believe marketers often overlook the process of customer evolution. In order to stay in tune with the customer (especially in today’s post-modern, multicultural world), however, the brand itself must also stay on top of this customer evolution and remain interested in the consumer thus resulting in the customer finding interest in the company who understands him and the establishment of a relationship which ultimately leads to brand loyalty.

This blog greatly improved my understanding of marketing as I was able to gain a clearer perception of what building a brand entails and the work required and the ultimate relationship that is developed with the consumer. In addition, Mike comment, “gentle reader and eager brand owner – tell me: Are you genuinely interested, or are you just trying to be interesting?” further solidified in my mind the idea that marketing does require a level of sincerity and desire to meet the desires of consumers and true marketing and brand building is not a series of manipulative tactics as it can often be portrayed to be.

If I had to critique one thing about this blog posting I would recommend that Mike also include an example on this topic regarding an actual business experience he has had and more related to brand building. Mike provided an example involving his son telling a story, however, I would have loved to learn more about his experience with this topic through a business focused example.

3 Comments:

Anonymous Michael Wagner said...

Very encouraging to read your commentary! Thank you for commenting. I found your critique helpful and followed the posting you reference with an example from Craig's List.

I sometimes lecture for MBA classes at Drake University here in Des Moines, Iowa. I love working with students. Your project at Bentley looks like a good one!

Anything I can do to encourage you and your classmates, please let me know.

Tuesday, March 21, 2006 12:22:00 PM  
Anonymous Michael Wagner said...

Very encouraging to read your commentary! Thank you for commenting. I found your critique helpful and followed the posting you reference with an example from Craig's List.

I sometimes lecture for MBA classes at Drake University here in Des Moines, Iowa. I love working with students. Your project at Bentley looks like a good one!

Anything I can do to encourage you and your classmates, please let me know.

Tuesday, March 21, 2006 12:22:00 PM  
Blogger Nicole Buress said...

Mike,

Thanks so much for your comment as it is always appreciated! Please accept my apology for missing your craigslist posting right after the intersted posting... I didn't catch that when I first read it but it was a great example and looks like my critique was unjustified! Thanks for catching me on that. It's great having marketing professionals comment on our class blog. It really adds a lot of value to the blog and fuels a lot of discussion during class. I look forward to reading more comments and to reading more postings on your blog as well! If you are in the Boston area any time soon let me know we are looking for class speakers!

Monday, April 03, 2006 9:01:00 PM  

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